4K Streaming Simplicity for the Classroom, with Panasonic & Wowza

Learn how Panasonic and Wowza technologies combine to connect your distance learners with course content in a simple but premium experience.

Description

Join Panasonic and Wowza Media Systems™ for a joint webinar showcasing how easily higher-education organizations can capture students’ attention via streaming. In this webinar we…

  • Introduce the Panasonic 4K PTZ camera
  • Explain the power of Wowza Streaming Engine™ software
  • Demonstrate the simple integration between Panasonic and Wowza™ products and show the basic setup
  • Highlight the practical applications of 4K streaming

Transcript

Delix Alex:

We have a great webinar planned for you. My name is Delix Joseph Alex. Quite simply my name is just Delix. I am a product manager over at Panasonic for our PTZ camera and IP networking systems. We also have Jamie Sherry on the line. Jamie, you want to go ahead and introduce yourself?

Jamie Sherry:

Sure. Thanks, Delix. Yeah, Jamie Sherry. I'm the product manager for Wowza Streaming Engine here at Wowza Media Systems.

DA:

The webinar we have planned her today is titled 4K Streaming Simplicity for the Classroom. This is a collaboration between Panasonic and Wowza Media Systems to show the benefits in the integration that exists between the two. Between Panasonic and Wowza Streaming Engine. Let's dive right in.

Just a brief overview of what we will be discussing here today. Mainly we will go through the Panasonic camera offerings, the in-camera streaming capabilities, which is a unique aspect to this whole workflow, the Wowza Streaming Engine and how Panasonic ties in there, and then we'll do a little bit of walkthrough and discussion on some applications and what you can really do with it. Then we'll leave it open for some questions towards the end.

I encourage you. You should all be able to see the question screen as we go through if you have any questions, please go ahead and submit them. Depending on the time at the end, we'll try to address some of those questions.

The workflow here is a Panasonic streaming enabled camera that uses an internal encoder that can push that stream out over IP to Wowza Steaming Engine. The key component here now is that you don't have to have all these other workflow items or rack and coders in between. It's quite simply just a camera connected to the network utilizing Wowza Streaming Engine to get your content from point A to point B.

Hopefully by the end of this webinar, you'll be able to realize the simplicity in it to achieve this. The other key component here is we're introducing some very high-end camera technology that is affordable yet high quality as you can see with this particular model we've shown here is the AW-UE70. One of the first 4K PTZs or pan-tilt-zoom cameras in the marketplace. I'll be discussing the camera components and then halfway through, I'll pass it on to Jamie over at Wowza to discuss the integration aspect of it.

Before we go and get too far, I just wanted to make mention of the applicable camera models as well as the two series of professional camera technology that apply in this case. The first is the AJ series PTZ cameras, which include the popular HE40, UE70, and HE130, but also are AJ series Pro P2 cameras apply. We're going to be focusing on the PTZ aspects in the Webinar, but keep in mind that you can utilize the integration functionality with some of the other cameras in our lineup.

One the Wowza side of things, what you will need for this integration is version 4.5, which was released in June, that allows for this functionality. What is Pro PTZ? The reason I bring this up is a lot of times people confuse professional PTZ cameras with security cameras or webcams. There's significant differences there. As the imagery shows on this slide here, what we're ultimately doing is taking the quality level that are in some of our broadcast cameras and putting it into a PTZ form factor that allows you to have several different advantages.

I mentioned the professional image quality. One of the cameras mentioned here, the AW-UE70 is capable up to a UHD 4K. Some of the other aspects are smooth pan- tilt-zoom functionality suitable for live, on-air type moves. This is a significant differentiator that allows you to utilize the camera on-air as if it was a manned camera for example. Some of the other aspects include a professional interfacing. Oftentimes these PTZ cameras are being put into a greater system, which requires a certain level of interfacing and technology that a security camera for example or a web camera would not offer you.

Finally the remote control capability. Looking at the total offerings here, it brings you to a completely higher level of capability. The key message that Panasonic has been promoting since we came out with integrated pan-tilt-zoom cameras starting from the HE50, HE100 days is moving towards an IP/IT type of world that'll allow you to utilize your existing IP infrastructure and ultimately … to control, to distribute all of these aspects. Moving forward, we're trying to get further and further simplified in terms of infrastructure to allow for single cable type solutions.

With the current generation AW generation of products, that is a key point. With the addition of POE Plus, or for those of you who don't know, Power Over Ethernet, now you can have power audio, streamed video, and control all over a single cable. In this visual here, all the cameras are simply connected to a network via a single cable, and now you can distribute it to a streaming engine such as Wowza Media Systems or any other component in a network environment.

The highlight of this webinar is the fact that the AW-UE70, one of our most popular models now, is the first 4K-capable PTZ to work with Wowza as part of the Works with Wowza Program. You get a 4K level picture out of a nice form factor with these professional capabilities that I mentioned to ultimately deliver your web cast or your streamed service in the highest quality possible.

Some of the other models that apply in this case are the HE130, UE70, and HE40. All of these three models work really well with Wowza to offer a streamlined connectivity as well as workflow to distribute the streams out of camera. As mentioned earlier, all of them have a similar core functionality with some slight differences. Starting at our entry level model, the AW-HE40, it is a full HD capable PTZ camera with 30x optical zoom with a choice of HDMI or SDI and a USB interface as well for interfacing it has a webcam. A higher-end type webcam for example where quality is a concern.

Then we have the UE70, which in design looks very similar to the HE40, but is capable of UHD 4K and offers some other professional aspects as well. Finally our flagship model, which is the AWHE130, which uses a very high-end 3[inaudible 00:11:45] imager giving you very good imagery, low-light performance, and such. With similar functions as the 40 and 70 in core functionality.

One key aspect to all of these PTZs is the versatile interfacing that we offer. I don't think any other PTZ manufacturer really can attribute to this because of the so many different options that we offer here in terms of interfacing into any kind of system whether it's simply a PC, whether it's a video production environment with a switcher, or a streamed video environment over IP. I think we give it to you all. Looking at this diagram, we have a traditional type base and HD SDI and HDMI. We have traditional control mechanisms like R422 and [inaudible 00:12:49], but we have new and upcoming technologies such as IPs that allow for those single cable solutions that I mentioned earlier.

Where this comes into play is the versatility in such a device to adapt to any type of video production that you need. The key point of this webinar is the core streaming capability of any of these three PTZs. As you can see, this chart is pretty detailed and I left this up here for those who are more technical out there. The key message here is that all three of these camera models have multiple channels of streaming, , whether it's a H264 or motion JPEG, to adapt to any bandwidth or resolution requirement of a particular system.

The AW-UE70 in this case also gives you the UHD streaming capability that works great with Wowza Streaming Engine to deliver your webcast, or your lecture, or whatever it may be in the highest quality possible. The second aspect here is also reliability and redundancy as well. Having multiple channels of streaming just in case a single channel is clogging up your bandwidth, you could quickly move to another, lower, bandwidth but still high quality channel to utilize to deliver your stream.

This is just simply a comparison between the three camera models. The UE70 falls into a nice little sweet spot where the imager is a little bit different, but gives you the 4K, but you get some of these other features as well. A lot of the times people confuse the 40 and 70 and I'd like to touch upon that for a moment here. The 40 and 70 in design look the same, but in terms of image performance and lens performance has significant differences. Where the 40 will give you a longer zoom length, in situations where that's required, the 40 performs well. The 70 the optical performance is much more even with a wider field of view, optical image stabilization, giving you some of the more professional aspects needed for certain environments where necessary.

The 130, which again, as I mentioned is our flagship model where live moves, and smoothness, and low-light performance is absolutely critical light performance is key. That's where that model comes into play. Another key component is the ability to remote control these PTZs. We have traditional hardware based type controllers such as the RP50 and RP120 that can be sitting in a control room in a college video production environment or it quite simply be a student operator who is calling up some pre-sets. Whatever it may be, the ability to remotely control your PTZ is quite important.

Going along with that is software based controllers as well for those who desire a different type of experience more similar to the smartphones or tablets we use. We have a control app for the iPad that utilizes what we call our HE10 accessory to quite an innovative tool to control the main PTZ. That bottom image on the right you'll see a wide-angle view of the room and you tap and the main camera moves to that position.

One thing we're happy to announce and show that will be coming out in the end of August is auto-tracking software that works with any of these three cameras that can also utilize automated tracking and control functionality so that is another key component when trying to deliver a lecture for example where a presenter is moving around or a stage environment for example where multiple things are happening. It used to be that you'd have to stick to a single wide-angle view of the room, but now there are innovative solutions to have a more produced, professional, video that you can deliver to your users.

That is a pretty high-level overview of what Panasonic offers in terms of the PTZ functionality, but let's segue now into the streaming engine side of it so we can really show the power of Wowza and Panasonic together. I'll pass it on to Jamie to continue this.

JS:

Thanks, Delix. Okay. For those who aren't familiar with Wowza Streaming Engine, we got a little tagline here, "Wowza Streaming Engine powers streaming of high-quality video and audio on any device, anywhere." Again, what Wowza Streaming Engine is is media software that you can deploy on your own hardware or in the cloud and we have a very versatile product that can deal with a lot of different scenarios around VOD and live streaming.

Yikes, I'm hitting the wrong arrow. Sorry. This is a workflow diagram that we have on our website. We show this. We've shown this for years and we show this quite a lot. Gives you a better perspective on where we fit into a common streaming workflow for both live and on-demand. On the left, you're going to have a series of input sources. It could be like we're talking about today, the Panasonic cameras over IP. I will note all of the sources we support today going into the product are IP based, so they have to come over an IP network.

If you have signals or source content that's coming in prior to that, you can use a variety of ways to convert it to IP-based transmission and then bring it in. We'll do a bunch of magic in the middle and I'll get to that in a second and then on the outbound side, the key is that we can deliver to all major marketing device platforms. Whether it's TVs, or gaming, tablets, computers, OTT, mobile, as you see here again probably the ones to talk about most here are the mobile, tablet, and computer. Somebody did have an Internet-capable TV up in a classroom. You could certainly have that up there as well.

In the middle, back to that, the sources we take in we support all major protocols and methods for bringing in live on-demand content. What we'll do in the middle at the very least is do what we call a transmux or a repackaging of that content to get it into the right formats for those devices. Those devices support fragmented format, and codec, and protocols today, so we normalize that in the middle and make it as widely supported as possible. We'll repackage it accordingly. That'll end up being either single bit rate or adapted bit rate streaming content.

What we do on top of that is things like transrate and transcodes. We have a live … for live we have a transcoder in the product that can handle codec and sizing changes for the content as well. Things we do on top of that we do also additional what I would call advanced features. Things like real time encryption and there's a variety of other security methods for locking down content. We deal with captions in a wide array of the standard formats out there today and bringing it through with the video or as what we call a sidecar. We deal with all sorts of other advanced features on top of that.

As I said, you can deploy it in the cloud on any major cloud provider. We do pre-built images for Google, Amazon, Azure. Pretty soon we'll have a few others. We're getting close to having a Docker implementation as well or you can do it on your own hardware and your own network. Institutions will probably most likely have this on Premise and so we do support that. We support Linux, and Windows, and Mac as operating systems, so all the major operating systems today. We do have specifications on our website for how to spec that hardware out if you do need assistance with that.

Once you have the delivery all set, of course you need players on the other side. One of the key things here that we have as a partner with ecosystem as well and so whether it's a player like JW Player. Another one in Europe called Bitmovin, which is a popular one these days. It has an HTML5 playback option or otherwise we can help with those types of partners. All throughout the workflow we have partners to help with all sorts of things from the captions and the user-end pieces as I mentioned to even on the input side we can help there too in a partner capacity.

The server also for live has, for example, things like recording as well. I forgot to mention that. One of the key things with institutions would be to do say a live lecture capturing. Actually record that and then have that available for an on-demand playback in case somebody missed that lecture or who wants to go back and see additional information about that actual session.

One of the key things we added to Wowza Streaming Engine as it relates to our partners is a feature we call Sources Live. So for live streaming we have the ability to bring in all of these encoder and camera vendor signals and we, through our user interface, make it a little bit more simple to either pull those in, as I'll demonstrate with Panasonic in a moment, or pre-configure those devices. Send a configuration down to those devices so that it's easier to push that connection up to our server software. This is the key to making this a little easier down the road.

Let's jump to a demo. I'll actually show you how we connect a Panasonic camera to Wowza Streaming Engine for playback. Okay, so I'm sitting in an instance of Wowza Streaming Engine through our user interface. We call it the Wowza Streaming Manager and I'm actually going to go. We already had this set up. I'm having one technical difficulty. Just bear with me a second.

All right. Let's try that now. Okay. I'm actually going to ... This is over this GoToWebinar, too, so bear with us on the ...

EP:

Hey Jamie, we can go ahead and create a new stream if you want.

JS:

Yeah, I just didn't recall the IP.

EP:

Yeah, I can type it.

JS:

If it's the same, I got it. I'm going to leave that in and we'll re-add it, so I'm going to go into Sources Live here and I'm going to select PTZ option and I'm going give it a name. I'm going to type in the IP and let's connect the PTZ functionality here too. I'll explain that in a minute. Come on.

I'm going to create a connection to this camera which is actually going to establish an actual USB connection to the camera, pull it in, and now what we should be able to do is go to our test player, and I'm going to actually play this as an RTNP stream out so that is using the packaging capability or the transmit capability in Wowza Streaming Engine to actually play this content. There we go. There's Delix. Say hi.

As you can see, with just a few inputs I can actually set up a Panasonic camera really easily. Now for the pan tilt zoom, I'm just going to show you we have built-in functionality for cameras that do support pan-tilt-zoom. We do have the ability for you to control the camera from the interface here. We have APIs for this as well. The rest of the API can be used for this. Of course the camera has its own interface as well to do this. As Delix mentioned, you can do production values, movements as well. I'm going to show you just real quick that I can demonstrate that I can move this camera from within Engine as well.

If you had really simple movements you wanted to do or adjustments you wanted to make, you can do that as well. There you go. Okay, so that's our demo. Real quick and I'm going to show a slide on it, but I'll talk about it, you may wonder what else you can do from here and so I'm going to touch on a few things. This is the camera coming in and going out as a simple single bit rate stream.

One of the things I may want to do is I may want to turn this into ABR [adaptive bit rate] competent. So you would take our live transcoder for example, which has a page right here. You can even set up a template to actually do an ABR output from that and then that ABR output could go into HLS. It could go into Adobe HDS. It can go into DASH. It could go into Smooth Streaming if you still do that. It can go into RTMP.

The next thing is you think about the device reach, you can get to all those tablets, and phones, and computers with ABR, adapted bit rate streaming, using the transcoder. Another piece that you might want, I don't know how important it is for a lecture to have a pause and rewind, but in our DVR component would allow you to actually enable that in player that was enabled to support DVR. Players have to have that support, but if they do, you can do that.

If you need security, you can't do it through the source security here. You can cheat it through the Sources Live. If you need a security on the inbound side, you can add things like a username, password on that RTSP connection coming in from the camera to Wowza Streaming Management for us to lock that down. You also can lock down the playback in a variety of ways. Again, we could implement things like full DRM, but we can also do simpler things like token authentication, client restrictions. You could limit it to IPs. You can do geo-targeting.

There's all sorts of security features at the wire level, the transmission level, the content level, and the actual link level as well. Lots of security features to contemplate there. The other piece is if you want to push this out. Let's say the audience is on campus, but let's say the campus is either a virtual campus, or it's got an extended audience outside he campus, you can use a feature we call Stream Targets to actually publish it to a destination.

We've got a variety of pre-supported destinations in here. Anything from another Wowza Streaming Engine Instance to our Wowza Streaming Cloud service, to Akamai, Facebook Live, YouTube. There are all sorts of ways to get out to a distributed edge network that if you have an audience that's far away or is a large audience where this feature would have would help you. Just a few more features there.

From there let's jump back to the slides. All right, and Delix, do you maybe want to advance the slide for me? I don't know if I can do that.

DA:

Sure.

JS:

Thank you. As I said, the basics that we showed the demo were to get a camera, a live source from a camera, pull that into Wowza Streaming Engine, and then push that out as a single bit rate playback and I demonstrated that as a flash RTNP stream as an example that could have been HLS. It could have been any other format we support today, which is again all the major formats.

Again, to just touch on the features we've got again, the ability to do that transmux like that and just discussed. We have real-time transcoding for live. We have user efficient APIs for more user interface for easy configuration, but the API's for more flexible programmatic means. People often want to extend the servers so our job API is really good for that or we have a rest API from which the user interface is actually built on that would allow you to programmatically configure, control, and manage the server.

We have the PTZ camera controls that I demonstrated. We have the ability to record. We have two ways of recording. We can record straight to MP4s and that can then be an automated thing depending on when the source is sensed coming in from the camera. It can automatically record out. The other way to do it is through our DVR content. You can actually save that off as MP4 files and do a clip extraction-like functionality.

There are two. I did touch on the multi-level content security. Anything from DRM all the way down to just protecting a link with a token authentication or an IP white list. Origin-edge, there are several ways to configure this single server to talk to an edge network for large audience widely distributed audience. I showed you stream targets.

That's one way to get to a CDN or a destination site like YouTube or Facebook but also you can get to another Wowza Engine instance. You can have many Wowza Streaming Engine instances used in a distributive fashion as an Origin Edge configuration. Captions, if there's ever a need for captions, live is a little tricky, but there are ways to inject live capture captions.

Tricky in the sense that you've got to have people involved capturing captions and things like that, but technically no problems supporting it and we have the ability to inject those captions. Either having them come in from the source stream or inject them through the API programmatically.

There we go. I'm going to pass it back to you, Delix.

DA:

Thanks, Jamie. Now that we've given you an overview of the camera's streaming engine. The question is, what can you really do with it. It's just what we have discussed thus far could be overly technical, so let's try to boil it down a little bit further.

Some of the key applications we're going to go over are as follows. Oftentimes when we think of a streaming camera, the first application that comes to mind is streaming from that camera directly to an end-user device, but there's several other use cases out there as well.

I'll go through each one of these. That first case, streaming direct to end-user devices. This could be for example a camera that's sitting in a classroom. Could be a camera that's sitting in some sort of test environment in a lab type setting where some test is running overnight or in progress and you want to remotely monitor it. It could be lecture capture as I mentioned. Pairing it with our auto-tracking software to have a nice produced remote viewing experience.

The ultimate thing is out of our cameras, we give you the RTMP/RTSP. With Wowza, we can deliver it straight to the end-user devices and I think the number of types of devices on the market these days just continues to grow and Wowza does a great job of keeping up with those technologies to make sure that streams can be delivered in that regard.

Moving along, one of the other use cases is also for multi-campus type distribution. I think universities, colleges, and onwards are having more and more satellite locations, are having more study abroad type programs, or are trying to bridge the gap between these locations.

To offer an in-classroom viewing environment in those satellite locations, so this was a use case that a friend, we have good friends over at Emerson College in the Massachusetts area. They were utilizing this type of functionality as a backup … to allow for stream distribution between campuses and remote viewing experiences for special events and such.

Finally the other key aspect here is not all people are viewing the content live, right? The camera gives you the functionality to stream but Wowza does have a great DVR and recording functionality, so lectures, or streamed events, and such can be viewed at a later time to give you a greater value in your lecture capture.

Jamie, do you have anything to add on any of these use cases?

JS:

No. You've hit it. There's the live streaming aspects. There is recording for later on-demand as you said, the distributed multi-campus approach again while distributing it can be used depending on the situation by either deploying Engine instances in each campus and using an internal low-latency protocol called WOWZ that we actually have where server communication can happen to actually get it from campus location to location or you have options to use the stream targets feature with things like a CDN deployment as well, so it's just going to depend, but there are lots of ways to do that. I guess the only other thing to touch on maybe is sometimes people have synchronized information they want to do and programmatically we support people that do that as well.

DA:

Great. I think we're running a little bit ahead of schedule, but if there are any questions, we can take them. I believe on the Wowza end of GoToWebinar we can see some of the questions.

EP:

That's right. Delix, I'm just going to throw these out and then Jamie and Delix, you can choose who to answer. "What are ND filters?"

DA:

ND filters. Okay. That was one of the differentiators between the 70 and the 40. ND stands for neutral density. One phenomenon often that occurs with these smaller center cameras is that when you close the iris or ultimately, I guess, reduce the brightness, the image has a tendency to get softer. Neutral density filters are actual filters that sit in front of the imager to ultimately reduce brightness without sacrificing quality and that softness that I mentioned earlier. Great question.

EP:

Great. "Can you output VR to multiple devices? Headset, monitor, computer."

DA:

Jamie, do you want to talk to any of the VR capabilities of Wowza?

JS:

Yeah, VR content is supported today is assuming that the camera is VR compatible and the player is VR compatible. The player could be a headset. Could be a computer. The answer to multiple devices is yes. Definitely you can send this out to many users, so I hope that helps.

DA:

Speaking to the camera side, the cameras we've shown in today's webinar, they aren't VR cameras or 360 cameras. Panasonic continues to research that technology, but this can deliver I guess somewhat of a similar experience in terms of viewing, but it is not 360.

EP:

Okay, next question. "How much does the UE70 cost?"

DA:

Yeah, so speaking to list prices, I'll go ahead and address all three cameras that I mentioned. The AW-HE40 is in the $3,000 to $4,000 price range. The UE70 is in the $5,000 to $6,000 price range. The 130, our flagship model is in the $8,000 to $9,000 range.

EP:

Great. "What are the encryption players?"

JS:

My guess is somebody's asking about the use of DRM and how you would ultimately decrypt that content to play it, so I'll address the question in that way and if it's not clear, then we can keep going here. While streaming engine's role in DRM is to do real time encryption, that's one half of what DRM is. You encrypt the content and then you decrypt it to actually watch it and it's transmitted in an encrypted format to protect it.

We partner today with key-management and DRM provider vendors that not only we interact with when we do the encryption because we need keys to actually do that, but then these companies will often provide players as well so the DRM vendors that we support today, most of them if not all of them will have players as well as there are some third party players out there like JW or Bitmovin that support DRM playback as well. We can take a note to send a list out if there's interest.

EP:

Okay. I'm going to try to rephrase this question. "Does adding transcoders appear to change your monthly bill?"

JS:

Ooh, tricky question. If you're a recent customer, meaning just over a year, then transcoding is built into the licensing for Wowza Streaming Engine, so no, your monthly bill would not change. We do not charge for the use of the feature or the volume of use in that feature. We did at one point though. We used to charge per transcoded stream per month.

You've got to be careful if you're on a version that is not enabled with what we call the pro model, which is what's standard now for everyone. Everyone's pro if you're a new customer. If you don't have that pro model, then you would pay those charges so you just want to maybe check with your license and maybe talk to our billing team about either switching over or at least understanding whether you have that billing model or not.

EP:

All right. "How many streams can be monitored at one time? Also, how many users can monitor a single stream?"

JS:

I'm going to treat that as a "How many streams in a capacity sense can be played or consumed?" We don't provide streaming performance benchmark numbers today. We are actually working on these. We're way overdue on them. We're working on them now. We'll have them later in this year.

We'll have some early numbers actually in this quarter. We can share those out. The way to look at the capacity, really the primary thing is around network throughput. The second thing is around CPU utilization. If you stick to network throughput, on a ten-gig-four, people are getting five to eight and that is both inbound and outbound, which can translate into hundreds to thousands of streams. Again, it just depends what you're trying to do, what the quality of that content is, and what else the server's doing at that time.

EP:

Great. "Does the camera have internal recording capabilities for backup?" Delix, that one's you.

DA:

Sure. The case with the HE40 and the UE70, there is internal recording capabilities. However, both the 40 and the 70 have what's called priority modes. For example, there is an IP priority mode. There is a USB priority mode. There is an SD card priority mode. In each of these modes there is certain limitations.

When utilizing the camera with Wowza, you would be in the IP priority mode to give you those H264 streams. You would not be able to record simultaneously to streaming to Wowza unfortunately, but you do have the option to switch the camera over into the other modes to record onto an internal micro SD card and that content could be FTP'd off of it. For example, there's several things you can do with it.

EP:

Okay, next question. "Do you have a recorded sample that we can view online? Maybe that you have uploaded to YouTube." I read the question by content from the PTZ camera, but maybe it's the demo. We should probably answer both.

DA:

I don't know of any particular content posted, but that's an action item I could take and could follow up on that question.

JS:

Yeah, on the Wowza side, we do do tutorials that we put up on our YouTube channel and you can look there are well to see not only a demo of doing camera connections with engines, but potentially the resulting content. If it's a desire to have resulting content from an actual Panasonic camera through engine out is the request, then we can follow up with that too.

EP:

"Do cameras need to be tethered or can they operate wireless? Is there any seamless provision for two-camera live switching between one camera locked down and one roaming, for example? …."

DA:

Okay, that's a very good question. The focus of this webinar was primarily a single camera type application, but the system could quickly grow as for this question. In the case of the tethered component to the question, the camera itself has an IP interface.

It could very well be hooked up to a wireless router, but ultimately, these cameras do require a power supply, whether it's thought Power Over Ethernet or DC Power. I think ultimately at minimum we will have to have the camera powered, so that may be considered a tether, but there are mechanisms to get them over a Wi-Fi network. If you do need to get that, the IP connectivity wireless.

The second component to that question was regarding multi-camera. The way it is today, pulling the streams out of the cameras, synchronization is an issue because of network delay and the unpredictable nature of a network in many cases. If you do require a multi-camera type of environment, you would first need to go into a switcher and then output from there to using a streaming mechanism.

For example, in the AE-HS50 switcher is an offering that we have or the AE-HS410 that can take multiple cameras in plus other effects and keys, and layers, and such and to give you more of a multi-camera production type environment.

EP:

Great. "What is the standard recommended hardware platform do you recommend deploying while the Streaming Engine in a campus-type deployment?"

JS:

I don't have the specs memorized, but we can send the specs out. We basically talk about the minimal processing storage requirements that you need to run Engine.

EP:

All right. "Do you offer in-depth training?" I'll let Panasonic do that and we'll do it as well.

DA:

Training is something that we do do. Especially in many campus type deployments or enterprise type deployments that is a service we offer at a charge where we'll have one our sales engineers visit with your team to go through the camera with you. As in-depth as you would want possible. That is something we do pretty regularly as well, but we also have guides and user tools available on the Web.

JS:

On the Wowza side, we have a variety of additional support options, the main one I would suggest is what we call coaching, while with the staff, they can actually get more in-depth into your use case and help you how to configure Wowza Streaming Engine to satisfy those two cases.

We also have an extensive consultant list that you can actually go on our focus, I actually reported a request and these are globally distributed consultants. They will actually come back and sign up to help you with that. Those are the main ones. Our support page on Wowza.com will actually tell you everything we do on support sizes.

EP:

Okay. "How is multi-cam being synced when switched between cameras?"

DA:

I believe I addressed that question earlier, but just to follow up on that as well. Again, synchronization of the network continues to be a very tricky thing and it's not trivial, so again, if a multi-camera synced type of environment is required, a live switcher such as the AV-HS450 or AV-HS410, would need to come in between to provide you that level of synchronization.

EP:

Great. Thank you, Delix. We're just going to run through these. We still have four of five left, so continue to stick with us if you'd like to hear these pearls of wisdom from Jamie and Delix.

Question for Wowza. "I run a 24x7 journalism channel via Wowza, but when I add the Panasonic AW-UE70 camera, a second transcoder channel started billing on my monthly bill. Is that right? Is there a cheaper way?"

DA:

Jamie, do you want to answer that question?

JS:

Yeah, I've got that. Sorry. We had a mute issue. Transcoder billing again for everyone on the latest and greatest is a flat model. There is no extra cost. My thought is you're on the older model, which is a per channel use per month, so you might want to consider reaching out to our billing team and we can help connect you if you want to get the flat-rate pricing.

What happened is, you're probably paying $55 a month plus the per-channel, transcoder channel, billing on top of that and the flat pricing moves to $65 a month on subscription. This is on the subscription side. Then transcoding per channel transcoding costs go away.

EP:

Great. "Audio quality is very important to the viewer's experience, especially for the education field." I think we can all agree with that. "When are they going to be able to listen to the facilitators, what can you say about the quality of the pan and tilt cameras?"

DA:

Sure. This is something I failed to address a little bit earlier. I apologize for that. On that one slide that I showed would be the interfacing panel. The current generation of AWUEs all have the audio input, so we do rely on the in-venue or the in-house audio capability, whether it's coming from a lapel of a lavaliere mic, or a boundary mic of some sort.

That would ultimately feed into the camera and ultimately into all that for Wowza distribution. We do not have internal mics on these cameras and practically speaking, these cameras are typically mounted up on a ceiling, or in the back of a space.

You wouldn't want to use the internal mic. You would want to use the in-venue or in-house PA and feed that audio in. Once the audio comes in, we use a very high quality of encoding so that from a camera perspective, there is no degradation to that.

EP:

This is very related. "How's the audio being hooked up separate to the audio mixer?"

DA:

Yeah. I think again, like you said, it's a related question. Audio comes into the camera, camera muxes audio and video for the RTMP/RTSP and Wowza takes that just as it is and distributes it.

EP:

Very good. "How was the video signal compared to DVX 200 or 270?"

DA:

A very good question. First of all, the true PX270. One of the PTZ models I mentioned, the AW-HE130, uses the same sensor technology as the PX270, so compared to the PX270, comparing the AW-HE130 to the 270, it's very similar quality. Comparing the 270 with some of the UE70 and the 40, I think there's two aspects.

I think the … CMOS sensor does a better job in color reproduction at low-light performance, but the UE70 will give you a nice sharp image as well. There's tradeoffs in both, but I think there's a comparable image quality between the two. Now the DVX 200, you have a completely different type of sensor technologies. What's called a larger sensor or a large sensor, the 4/3 inch, which is designed for more that video-production-type look with a shallow depth of field and such.

These PTZ cameras aren't really designed for a shallow depth of field because of the environment they're used in. For example, in an education setting, you wouldn't want a shallow depth of field where the presenter looks great, but you don't see what's behind him on the board. You need a depth of field that shows an even image and such. That's my take on it. Different tools for different applications.

EP:

Okay, so we've got one more minute and we will roll through these last couple of questions really quickly. "Can you use the Wowza Streaming Engine to connect with an existing live stream.com account?"

JS:

As far as I understand, I believe this to be true that non-livestream.com tools can not publish into livestream.com. You've got to use a publishing tool from livestream.com. Their stuff on Twitter or their studio stuff. That's a limitation on their side.

EP:

"Are you doing multicasts or unicasts?"

JS:

While Streaming Engine supports multicasts, in this case, we're doing a unicast.

EP:

"Using Panasonic remote cameras tri-casters for switching. Can Tricasters be used with Wowza Streaming Engine to webcast to an external provider like livestream.com from not distributing live viewing?"

JS:

Tricaster is supported. However, again, livestream.com is not supported. That's not a Wowza thing, that's a livestream.com thing.

DA:

Just one quick note. Tricaster does accept the stream straight out of the Panasonic PTZ, so there would not be anything special in between what's required.

EP:

Right. Then "Can you use Wowza with a new type of Panasonic camera to do live multi-camera, live over IP?"

JS:

Ultimately the answer is yes. Network delay would have to be taken into account, again because of the whole synchronization type issue, but it could be done.

EP:

Okay.

DA:

I'll add to this one question on VR. We certainly can help you on VR streaming questions, so if you have them, forward them on. Send them on a Wowza.com and our sales team will pick them up right away and answer them.

EP:

Delix and Jamie, thank you very much for your time and I appreciate all of you for attending our webinar.

DA:

Yeah, thanks for joining, guys.

JS:

Thank you, guys, and please feel free to reach out if we can answer anything further. Thank you.